Saturday 24.3 at 4pm at Arkadia: Parallel, Distant & Present- Santeri Rautiainen, recital for guitar

Dear friend of Arkadia,

You are invited to Parallel, Distant & Present- Santeri Rautiainen, recital for guitar

on Saturday 24.3 at 4pm at Arkadia (Nervanderinkatu 11).

Programme:

Frank Martin (1890-1974): Quatre pièces brèves  (1933)                                       

 -Prélude

-Air

-Plainte

-Comme une gigue

J.S. Bach (1685-1750): Suite in c minor BWV 997

-Prelude

-Fuga

John Dowland (1563-1626): Fantasia P. 71

Benjamin Britten (1913-1976): Nocturnal after John Dowland op. 70 (1963)

-Musingly

-Very Agitated

-Restless

-Uneasy

-March-like

-Dreaming

-Gently Rocking

-Passacaglia

-Slow and Quiet

 

Welcome!

Warm regards,

 

Ian         
www.arkadiabookshop.fi

Entrance is free but a donation of €3 (or more!) to fund the event is suggested and would be most welcome. If you have no loose change or coins we gladly accept payment via Visa Electron or Mastercard etc.!

 

Santeri Rautiainen is a Helsinki-based guitarist finishing his studies at the Sibelius Academy. He is known as an active solo-performer throughout Finland, and is also engaged in premiering new music. He has also worked as an chamber-musician, with repertoire ranging from Piazzolla to micro-tonal contemporary music, also performing with Uusinta Ensemble. Besides studies in Helsinki with Ismo Eskelinen and Otto Tolonen, he also has gained important instruction from Oscar Ghiglia, Judicael Perroy, Manuel Barrueco and David Russel in numerous masterclasses.

In his work, he tries to build up interpretation of musical piece from the perspective of the piece itself: a composition has it’s unique DNA, and the work itself creates the ways to perform it. Deep listening of the sound, space and body are tools that he emphasizes when approaching a composition.

In this concert he performs music from different composers, who have influenced each other in different ways. Swiss Frank Martin had the sound of 20th century in his works, still he owed heavily to the style of Bach. John Dowland and Benjamin Britten proved the time of two different Elizabeths, still inspired by the same English melancholy.